Patience, kindness, and washing our hands will see us thru this.

Editorial

Wednesday, May 20 2020

Businesses are reopening.

Kids are preparing for a partial return to school on June 1.

BC is at the end of the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, and is starting a slow and measured restart.

Part of doing that is realizing everyone, everyone, is going to do this at a different pace, and have different reasons for that.

And many, like seniors and those with health conditions, are not going to be opening their circles, they will be staying where they have been for the past two to three months. 

Here’s the commitment to make with those around us, to our friends and family. Whatever decisions are made by family and friends, to support and respect those decisions. Remember that if they open their circle up, it is ok to not enter. It might not be the right time. And if a circle is opened for them, but they don’t enter into it, the time might not be right for them. 

If a business doesn’t re-open, it doesn’t mean they don’t value anyone’s patronage, it might mean they can’t meet the requirements, or they’re not ready to be open yet.

Then there’s the return to school. The first rule of returning to what is going to be a part-time session of school is that it is voluntary. The second rule is if someone makes a decision, support it, don’t judge it. At least not out loud. We don’t know what each family’s situation is. The choice to open for those few weeks could be good, it could mean a small number of kids get to learn ‘the new way’ of doing things so they can coach the other kids when more return in September. 

It can mean the Grade 7 students get some kind of closure before they leave Gabriola Elementary School forever. 

For the kids too young to be left at home alone, it does mean for two days a week parents can ‘get stuff done’ be that paid work, home work, or straight up respite. For the older students, who will likely only get one day a week, it could mean valuable face time with their teacher, to go over material more in depth than they can manage through a computer screen. It could mean parents with kids too young for GES get some extremely valuable time with those younger kids. 

There are a lot of potential positives, and we can trust the staff at GES and the health authority to put measures in place.

But again, voluntary, and it’s ok to not send kids back too.

Patience, kindness, and washing our hands see us thru this.